The viral photo that states it is the sword of Mahrana Pratap is false.

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Claim: A photo of a sword and a scabbard has been going viral on social media with the claim that it is the sword of Maharana Pratap. The viral photo has a description attached to it that describes how one sword weighs 50 Kgs  and urges the reader to imagine the caliber required by the warrior and how it is sad that it is not mentioned in our history books.

The message attached reads as follow:

“The sword of Maharana Pratap weighs around 50 Kgs each, he used to offer one Sword to the Enemy when his enemy would be disarmed. Imagine the calibre of this warrior in battlefield. But Sadly there is not much mentioned in our History books.

Courtesy: Ramaswamy.”

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Truth

The sword doesn’t belong to Mahrana Pratap. Upon doing a simple reverse image search, it was found that the sword belonged to  Muhammad XII. The viral photo was found on various websites. It was featured in an article under Islamic History on WordPress and a website called Imgur. Both the sites state that the sword and scabbard belonged to Boabdil (Muhammad XII), Nasir of Granada. A website called Sword-Site also has the image goes on to explain the inscription on the sword. Sword-Site also mentions that the sword belongs to Boabdil and states that on the hilt there is an inscription with the motto of the Nasrid dynasty: La ghaliba ila Allah (No Victor but God).

Thus it is proved that the sword doesn’t belong to Maharana Pratap.

 

Attached below are the screenshots and links of the websites that has featured the viral photo.

Source: Word Press

 

Source: Imgur

 

Source: Sword-Site

Ashitha S. Prasad
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Ashitha S. Prasad

Wondering and questioning. Learning and unlearning. Aspiring to narrate stories to make a difference. Smiling through the entire process.